Saturday, July 23, 2011

One Small Square - Outdoor Hour Challenge #9

I was looking at the Handbook of Nature Study website, and came across One Small Square - Outdoor Hour Challenge #9.

Throughout this post, three different typefaces are used:
- Bold - are words from the Handbook of Nature Study website.
- Italics - are words from the book titled Handbook of Nature Study by Anna Botsford Comstock.
- Regular - are my own words.

“Children should be encouraged to quietly and
patiently watch the bee, spider, ant, caterpillar or
other wildlife that crosses their path.
If this seems dull to them,
they just need to watch more closely,
because their alert eyes can catch the smallest ways of insects
in ways that grown-ups can’t without magnifiers.”
~ Charlotte Mason, volume 1, Outdoor Life, page 57 ~
1. Let’s give ourselves a challenge. Gather yarn, scissors, ruler, and four rocks. (Optional: small garden trowel and magnifying lens.)


Measure off one square somewhere out in your yard or near-by park. (I prefer to do this somewhere I can dig up a few inches of soil and not get into trouble.) Use your ruler to place rocks in a one foot square plot. Use the yarn to mark off the edges of your square.

Now the challenge comes in. See how many different things you can find in your square. If there are leaves, lift them up and see what is underneath. If there are rocks or gravel, scrape them aside and see what is underneath.

If there is grass or weeds and you have permission, use your trowel to dig up a few inches under the grass, moving it carefully to the side to replace when you are done observing. Use your hand lens if you have one along with you on your challenge.

I remember reading about this activity when I did a summer camp program for children and thought it was such a wonderful way to closely explore a small section of the world.

By having such a tiny section in which to explore, one is essentially "forced" to take her time to look carefully and go section-by-section and find new things.

Olivia discovering a world within the square of yarn. 

Olivia found some things right away within her square: a small stick, odd-shaped leaves, grass, and moss.

Sophia identifying what she sees first
without a magnifying glass.

After a little while, Olivia felt she had identified everything in the square. I joined her and we were able to find some more items that she had missed on her first time around the square.

Looking a bit closer,
Olivia found even more items.

Olivia used her magnifying glass to find a few more items: part of a pinecone, ferns, creeping Charlie, some kind of clover, dandelion leaf, dew, and a pine needle.

Sophia seemed to have found an interesting section of the front yard. Right away she said she saw: grass, pinecone shaving, wood, creeping Charlie, old pine needles, a bit of dirt, moss, dew, and a few little ferns.

Sophia exploring another section of the square.

By alternating with her magnifying glass and getting closer to the ground, Sophia found even more items in the 1 square foot of space: seed pod, few pieces of bark, a weird-shaped leaf that looks like a heart, a few roots, old grass that's turning brown, a dandelion leaf, wet ground, and tiny little bugs.

That's quite a diversity of natural items within such a small amount of space. Imagine what is in twice that amount of land...or the entire farm. 

It's so easy to rush through each day without taking the time to slow down and appreciate the small things in life. If we hadn't done this Outdoor Hour Challenge, we would not have enjoyed seeing two miniature worlds right in the front yard. 

Although each one was similiar to the other in some respects (e.g., both had grass, moss, and dew), there were unique elements in each square which made it all the more fascinating to further explore and take one's time in finding as many different things as possible.

2. Add any new items to your focus list that you are keeping in your nature journal. Add any items to your collection that you found during this week’s challenge time. Give an opportunity for a nature journal entry. If you used your hand lens during this week’s challenge, encourage your child to draw something they saw that you would not normally see like a small insect, worm, or seed.

The girls each chose a few small items that can be pressed and placed into their nature journals. Once the items are pressed, they will write and illustrate the entry for the day. 

Because I wrote the list of items they found as they were saying them, they can simply copy their lists at a later date.

3 comments:

Deceptively Educational said...

What a GREAT idea! My post today (a nature scavenger hunt) echoes the same sentiment - nature is full of wonder if we only stop to look. I'm going to have to do this activity with my son to reinforce that lesson. Thanks SO MUCH for sharing!

J at www.deceptivelyeducational.blogspot.com

pink and green mama MaryLea said...

So fun!! Thanks for sharing and linking up on the Smart Summer Challenge linky! I wish our code red air quality/heat wave would end so we could get some quality play time in our backyard.

Fondly,
pink and green mama
MaryLea

Barb-Harmony Art Mom said...

I love what you wrote here:
"It's so easy to rush through each day without taking the time to slow down and appreciate the small things in life. If we hadn't done this Outdoor Hour Challenge, we would not have enjoyed seeing two miniature worlds right in the front yard."

That sort of sums up this challenge and how much we have right under our noses to learn about if you take the opportunity. Thanks for sharing your link with the OHC.